Cuomo Says He Won’t Bow to ‘Cancel Culture’ and Rejects Calls to Resign

Representative Hakeem Jeffries, the New York City Democrat who serves as the House Democratic caucus chair, has also not called for Mr. Cuomo to step aside. Still, the defection of so many New York Democrats is a troubling sign for Mr. Cuomo, who effectively controls the state party and has been perhaps the state’s most famous politician, particularly since the beginning of the pandemic, when he was hailed as a hero in some quarters, and when his name was whispered as a possible presidential contender. The coordination of the calls to resign also marked the sudden deterioration of the governor’s standing, and prompted new questions about his ability to survive the dual scandals. Indeed, Mr. Nadler and many of the members who called on Mr. Cuomo to resign had previously said they supported investigations, not resignation. But they said Friday that their positions had shifted as more women accused Mr. Cuomo of inappropriate conduct. “Recently, the deeply disturbing allegations of at least six women, including several former employees, offer detailed descriptions of sexual misconduct that raise additional concerns about the governor’s fitness to hold any position of public trust,” Representative Mondaire Jones, a recently elected progressive who represents the Hudson Valley, said in a statement. “For the good of our state and everyone who calls it home, I urge Governor Cuomo to resign.” Also calling for Mr. Cuomo to step down were Representatives Jamaal Bowman, Yvette Clarke, Antonio Delgado, Adriano Espaillat, Brian Higgins, Carolyn Maloney, Sean Patrick Maloney, Grace Meng, Paul Tonko and Nydia M. Velázquez. Including Ms. Rice, 14 of the state’s 19 House Democrats have called for Mr. Cuomo’s resignation. Most of New York’s eight Republican representatives had already said the governor should step down.

Cuomo Says He Won’t Bow to ‘Cancel Culture’ and Rejects Calls to Resign
Representative Hakeem Jeffries, the New York City Democrat who serves as the House Democratic caucus chair, has also not called for Mr. Cuomo to step aside. Still, the defection of so many New York Democrats is a troubling sign for Mr. Cuomo, who effectively controls the state party and has been perhaps the state’s most famous politician, particularly since the beginning of the pandemic, when he was hailed as a hero in some quarters, and when his name was whispered as a possible presidential contender. The coordination of the calls to resign also marked the sudden deterioration of the governor’s standing, and prompted new questions about his ability to survive the dual scandals. Indeed, Mr. Nadler and many of the members who called on Mr. Cuomo to resign had previously said they supported investigations, not resignation. But they said Friday that their positions had shifted as more women accused Mr. Cuomo of inappropriate conduct. “Recently, the deeply disturbing allegations of at least six women, including several former employees, offer detailed descriptions of sexual misconduct that raise additional concerns about the governor’s fitness to hold any position of public trust,” Representative Mondaire Jones, a recently elected progressive who represents the Hudson Valley, said in a statement. “For the good of our state and everyone who calls it home, I urge Governor Cuomo to resign.” Also calling for Mr. Cuomo to step down were Representatives Jamaal Bowman, Yvette Clarke, Antonio Delgado, Adriano Espaillat, Brian Higgins, Carolyn Maloney, Sean Patrick Maloney, Grace Meng, Paul Tonko and Nydia M. Velázquez. Including Ms. Rice, 14 of the state’s 19 House Democrats have called for Mr. Cuomo’s resignation. Most of New York’s eight Republican representatives had already said the governor should step down.