Images From a ‘Day of Shame’ in Myanmar

In a weekend of carnage, Myanmar security forces killed protesters in more than 40 cities and towns as the military regime that seized power two months ago sought to put down opposition to its rule. Soldiers and the police killed more than 126 people on Saturday and Sunday, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a human rights group that is tracking the deaths. At least seven were children, including a 5-year-old boy, two 13-year-old boys and a 14-year-old girl. A baby girl in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, was struck in the eye with a rubber bullet. Her parents said she was expected to survive. Saturday, which the military celebrated as Armed Forces Day, was the deadliest day in Myanmar since the Feb. 1 coup, with 114 people killed. “Today is a day of shame for the armed forces,” said Dr. Sasa, a spokesman for a group of ousted elected officials who say they represent Myanmar’s government. The killings also drew condemnation from countries around the word, including the United States, Britain and the European Union. “The shameful, cowardly, brutal actions of the military and police — who have been filmed shooting at protesters as they flee, and who have not even spared young children — must be halted immediately,” said the U.N. Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Alice Wairimu Nderitu, and U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, in a joint statement. “The international community has a responsibility to protect the people of Myanmar from atrocity crimes,” they added. President Biden also condemned the killing. “It’s absolutely outrageous, and based on the reporting I’ve gotten, an awful lot of people have been killed totally unnecessarily,” he told reporters on Sunday. The widespread killings came after military-run television threatened protesters Friday with getting “shot in the back and the back of the head” if they persisted in opposing military rule. Many of the victims were bystanders, families and witnesses said. In Meiktila, a city in central Myanmar, 14-year-old Ma Pan Ei Phyu was at home when security forces began shooting randomly in the neighborhood, said her father, U Min Min Tun. The family did not hear a shot, and they didn’t realize that she had been killed until she fell to the floor, having been hit in the chest. In Yangon, Maung Wai Yan Tun, 13, was playing outside when the police and soldiers arrived. Scared, he ran away and was shot, his mother told the online news outlet Mizzima. The family went to recover his body, but finding it surrounded by security forces, they dared not approach. Sunday Protesters got ready ahead of a crackdown by the security forces, in Tharketa township in Yangon, above. Protesters used homemade weapons, such as air guns and slingshots, to defend against the security forces coming into their neighborhood, in Tharketa township. Protesters clashed with security forces in Tharketa township. Aiming at security forces with a makeshift weapon that shoots marbles. Protesters ran as security forces advanced to crack down on them, in Hlaing township in Yangon. A young protester who was injured by a rubber bullet during a clash with security forces in Tharketa township. The front line in Tharketa township. Ko Myo Lwin, 39, a protester from the Yangon area, arrived at a hospital with injuries resulting from at least 20 rubber bullets and a live-ammunition gunshot wound. Above, family members and relatives mourned near the body of Kyaw Htet Aung, 19, a high school student who was shot by security forces on Saturday in Dala, a township in Yangon, above. Below, a protester ran past a roadblock in Yangon. An injured protester being carried to a hospital. The mother of Aung Zin Myint, 20, mourned over the body of her son, a student shot by security forces earlier in the morning in Dala Township, near Yangon. The police arresting a protester in Yangon. Nay Win Tun, left, and Moe Moe Khine, carrying their 1-year-old daughter, Thin Thawdaw Tun, who was struck in the eye by a rubber bullet fired by the security forces while the baby was inside their home in Yangon. Family members mourning as social workers took away the body of U Win Myint, 46, who was shot in the chest as security forces fired on protesters in Dala Township. Protesters preparing for a crackdown by the security forces. Protesters taking refuge behind makeshift barriers. A protester with a gunshot wound arriving at a hospital in Yangon. Social workers carrying away the coffin of Kyaw Htet Aung.

Images From a ‘Day of Shame’ in Myanmar
In a weekend of carnage, Myanmar security forces killed protesters in more than 40 cities and towns as the military regime that seized power two months ago sought to put down opposition to its rule. Soldiers and the police killed more than 126 people on Saturday and Sunday, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a human rights group that is tracking the deaths. At least seven were children, including a 5-year-old boy, two 13-year-old boys and a 14-year-old girl. A baby girl in Yangon, Myanmar’s largest city, was struck in the eye with a rubber bullet. Her parents said she was expected to survive. Saturday, which the military celebrated as Armed Forces Day, was the deadliest day in Myanmar since the Feb. 1 coup, with 114 people killed. “Today is a day of shame for the armed forces,” said Dr. Sasa, a spokesman for a group of ousted elected officials who say they represent Myanmar’s government. The killings also drew condemnation from countries around the word, including the United States, Britain and the European Union. “The shameful, cowardly, brutal actions of the military and police — who have been filmed shooting at protesters as they flee, and who have not even spared young children — must be halted immediately,” said the U.N. Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Alice Wairimu Nderitu, and U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, in a joint statement. “The international community has a responsibility to protect the people of Myanmar from atrocity crimes,” they added. President Biden also condemned the killing. “It’s absolutely outrageous, and based on the reporting I’ve gotten, an awful lot of people have been killed totally unnecessarily,” he told reporters on Sunday. The widespread killings came after military-run television threatened protesters Friday with getting “shot in the back and the back of the head” if they persisted in opposing military rule. Many of the victims were bystanders, families and witnesses said. In Meiktila, a city in central Myanmar, 14-year-old Ma Pan Ei Phyu was at home when security forces began shooting randomly in the neighborhood, said her father, U Min Min Tun. The family did not hear a shot, and they didn’t realize that she had been killed until she fell to the floor, having been hit in the chest. In Yangon, Maung Wai Yan Tun, 13, was playing outside when the police and soldiers arrived. Scared, he ran away and was shot, his mother told the online news outlet Mizzima. The family went to recover his body, but finding it surrounded by security forces, they dared not approach. Sunday Protesters got ready ahead of a crackdown by the security forces, in Tharketa township in Yangon, above. Protesters used homemade weapons, such as air guns and slingshots, to defend against the security forces coming into their neighborhood, in Tharketa township. Protesters clashed with security forces in Tharketa township. Aiming at security forces with a makeshift weapon that shoots marbles. Protesters ran as security forces advanced to crack down on them, in Hlaing township in Yangon. A young protester who was injured by a rubber bullet during a clash with security forces in Tharketa township. The front line in Tharketa township. Ko Myo Lwin, 39, a protester from the Yangon area, arrived at a hospital with injuries resulting from at least 20 rubber bullets and a live-ammunition gunshot wound. Above, family members and relatives mourned near the body of Kyaw Htet Aung, 19, a high school student who was shot by security forces on Saturday in Dala, a township in Yangon, above. Below, a protester ran past a roadblock in Yangon. An injured protester being carried to a hospital. The mother of Aung Zin Myint, 20, mourned over the body of her son, a student shot by security forces earlier in the morning in Dala Township, near Yangon. The police arresting a protester in Yangon. Nay Win Tun, left, and Moe Moe Khine, carrying their 1-year-old daughter, Thin Thawdaw Tun, who was struck in the eye by a rubber bullet fired by the security forces while the baby was inside their home in Yangon. Family members mourning as social workers took away the body of U Win Myint, 46, who was shot in the chest as security forces fired on protesters in Dala Township. Protesters preparing for a crackdown by the security forces. Protesters taking refuge behind makeshift barriers. A protester with a gunshot wound arriving at a hospital in Yangon. Social workers carrying away the coffin of Kyaw Htet Aung.