The 65+ Crowd Is Vaccinated and Ready to Party

Nancy Arcadipone, 71, who splits time between Chicago and Kalamazoo, Mich., is planning her first trip to the Southwest in 45 years, and plotting when she can next enjoy eggplant parmigiana at La Scarola and a margarita next to a couple of tacos at Frontera Grill, both in Chicago, and live music performances. All within tantalizing reach. Still, her elation is tempered by the generational reversal of vaccine fortunes. “I feel the worst for the younger generation,” Ms. Arcadipone said. “My generation really got to live, experience and experiment. I feel sad for younger people. I find it kind of strange that our generation gets to be socially free first after a year of isolation.” Andrea Westberg, 73, sees it through all lenses, having missed out on a customized tour of Italy last summer with her teenage grandchildren. She and her husband, Gary, 74, moved to an active adult community in Roseville, Calif., two months before the world locked down and immediately longed for the incipient community pickleball, wine club get-togethers, potlucks and seeing new neighbors. “We were so disappointed,” Ms. Westberg said. “We kept busy decorating a new home, but not being able to share it with guests, including our sons and families, was very sad and lonely.” At last, she is together with family again. “I am hopeful for the future but cautious,” she said. “I grieve for those lives lost and hope that science and truth prevail in the years to come.”

The 65+ Crowd Is Vaccinated and Ready to Party
Nancy Arcadipone, 71, who splits time between Chicago and Kalamazoo, Mich., is planning her first trip to the Southwest in 45 years, and plotting when she can next enjoy eggplant parmigiana at La Scarola and a margarita next to a couple of tacos at Frontera Grill, both in Chicago, and live music performances. All within tantalizing reach. Still, her elation is tempered by the generational reversal of vaccine fortunes. “I feel the worst for the younger generation,” Ms. Arcadipone said. “My generation really got to live, experience and experiment. I feel sad for younger people. I find it kind of strange that our generation gets to be socially free first after a year of isolation.” Andrea Westberg, 73, sees it through all lenses, having missed out on a customized tour of Italy last summer with her teenage grandchildren. She and her husband, Gary, 74, moved to an active adult community in Roseville, Calif., two months before the world locked down and immediately longed for the incipient community pickleball, wine club get-togethers, potlucks and seeing new neighbors. “We were so disappointed,” Ms. Westberg said. “We kept busy decorating a new home, but not being able to share it with guests, including our sons and families, was very sad and lonely.” At last, she is together with family again. “I am hopeful for the future but cautious,” she said. “I grieve for those lives lost and hope that science and truth prevail in the years to come.”